Unit: AQA Love and Relationships Poetry

Lessons:

18 lessons

Porphyria's Lover (Part 1)

In this lesson, we will explore the key messages and meanings in Browning's poem 'Porphyria's Lover'. We will examine the key context linked to Browning and the poem to help to develop our understanding of the text. This lesson covers a poem that describes the violent death of a woman. If this is a sensitive topic to you, we recommend checking with a trusted adult before starting, or completing the lesson with a trusted adult nearby.

Porphyria's Lover (Part 2)

In this lesson, we will explore how Browning has used language, form and structure to present ideas about possession in 'Porphyria's Lover'. This lesson covers a poem that describes the violent death of a woman. If this is a sensitive topic to you, we recommend checking with a trusted adult before starting, or completing the lesson with a trusted adult nearby.

The Farmer's Bride (Part 1)

In this lesson, we will focus on the poem 'The Farmer's Bride' by Charlotte Mew. We will explore key contextual factors and key meanings within the poem. This lesson covers a poem which explores adult relationships and the objectification of women. If this is a sensitive topic to you, we recommend checking with a trusted adult before starting, or completing the lesson with a trusted adult nearby. The poet reflects some of the attitudes of the time it was written. This does not mean that the attitudes are supported by the poet. Poets often use poetry to explore issues relating to inequality and injustice. This means they sometimes portray ideas and attitudes the reader will object to.

The Farmer's Bride (Part 2)

In this lesson, we will continue to focus on the poem 'The Farmer's Bride' by Charlotte Mew. We will closely focus on the language, form and structure of the poem. This lesson covers a poem which explores adult relationships and the objectification of women. If this is a sensitive topic to you, we recommend checking with a trusted adult before starting, or completing the lesson with a trusted adult nearby The poet reflects some of the attitudes of the time it was written. This does not mean that the attitudes are supported by the poet. Poets often use poetry to explore issues relating to inequality and injustice. This means they sometimes portray ideas and attitudes the reader will object to.